How to Spot a Bad Recruiter ?

  • Were you contacted about a specific position? 

    Does the recruiter have an actual, open position in mind for you, or is he simply adding you to his pool of prospects?  Common sense would indicate that successful recruiters are too busy placing people in actual positions to bother with trolling the online job boards for candidates.
     


  • Has the recruiter accurately evaluated your qualifications?  

    Are you being referred for a position for which you are either over- or under-qualified?  A recruiter is not likely to share your professional expertise, but the employer definitely knows what they’re looking for, and you know what you can do.  Is the recruiter creating a good match?
     


  • What has the recruiter learned about you? 

    Did he ask enough questions to learn the important things about you that would make you attractive to a potential employer, and what your expectations are of a new job?  The recruiter effectively becomes your agent in dealing with a prospective employer, and what value does he add if he doesn’t know anything more than what can be seen on your resume?
     


  • Did the recruiter help you to prepare for an interview?

    Were you provided with a detailed position description so you could prepare responses to questions you are likely to be asked?  Did you get enough information about the company to be confident it’s a place you’d like to work?  The worst interview of my life was arranged by a recruiter.  He set up the interview time and location, but didn’t provide me with any information about the position beyond its title.  I was not remotely qualified, and it was painfully obvious that the interviewer felt it was a complete waste of time, as did I.  That experience resulted in a new personal rule: don’t schedule an interview without a position description in hand.  I want to evaluate for myself whether I’m qualified for the position, and whether it’s a position I would want.
     


  • Has the recruiter matched your expectations to what the prospective employer is offering?  

    This may be difficult to determine, but you’ll know it if it hasn’t happened, and it won’t be pretty.  A recruiter who knew my salary requirements once sent me on an interview for a position that sounded very exciting.  I took a half day off of work, drove an hour and a half to the company’s office, and had a fantastic hour-long interview with the hiring manager.  I was certain he was ready to offer me the job on the spot when he asked what salary I was looking for.  When he found out we were $20,000 apart, the interview ended with a sudden and resounding thud.  I recommend having the recruiter ensure you’re in the same ballpark as the prospective employer in order to avoid a long, disappointing drive home.

Depending on your level of motivation, you may not want to pass up any opportunity at all, even with a bad recruiter.  For this reason, bad recruiters will continue to exist.  However, working with a bad recruiter can waste valuable time, and can result in unpleasant, even ego-damaging and reputation-threatening experiences with prospective employers.  

Can you really afford the risk ... ?? 
___________________________________________________________________
Mohit Sah
ERP Expert
Phone:412-406-2917 |e-Fax:412-774-1831|email : mohit.sah@mastech.com
1000 Commerce Drive, Suite 500 | Pittsburgh, PA 15275

Mohit Sah
ERP Expert